Library-Inspired Last Minute Halloween Costumes

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Need a last minute costume idea for Halloween?  Hey, the library can help you with that, too.  Here are a few suggestions that will be easy to pull off, even on a limited budget (or no budget at all):

h2g2Arthur Dent from The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams – When the world ends, Arthur is still in his pajamas and bathrobe, so put on your pjs, throw a robe on, and be sure to grab your towel… no intergalactic hitchhiker goes anywhere without a towel, the most useful object in the known universe.  Not only is this one of the easiest costumes ever, it’s arguably the most comfortable.


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Day-Off Wolverine from Astonishing X-Men Books 1 and 2 by Joss Whedon and John Cassaday – Wolverine is undeniably cool, but his various comic book costumes would look weird in the real world.  On his downtime, though, his look is really easy to pull off… just a dirty t-shirt (or no t-shirt), dirty flannel shirt, dirty jeans, some heavy duty hair gel, and you’re good to go.  See?

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He’s the best there is at what he does, and he doesn’t even need to dress up for it.


jack-welch-winning

Former CEO and business guru Jack Welch – He led General Electric, he’s renowned for his business acumen, and he name dropped Bryant in his book, Winning.  Chances are you’ve got business clothes in your closet already, so grab out a shirt and tie, and walk around with either some GE small appliance or a bottle of Welch’s Grape Juice (which he had nothing to do with but it did inspire a good joke about “mind grapes” on 30 Rock a few years back, so it counts).


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Looking for Alaska by John Green – Why be a single character when you can be the whole book? Just make up a poster with a picture of the state of Alaska, write “Have you seen this state?” over it, and grab a pair of binoculars.

Look, you waited until the last minute, okay?  They can’t all be winners.


A Course Reserve Book – This one is super easy… make a big green rectangle with a black, uppercase “R” on it.  Then make a big yellow circle with a professor’s name on it.  Stick those both on yourself somewhere, say you’ll be going out for two hours, and then actually return much later after everyone else has been looking for you forever.

(Yeah, we totally notice when you do that. 🙂 )


However you spend Halloween, have a good time, be safe, and because you’re never too old for Trick or Treating, remember to avoid the houses that hand out healthy snacks or toothbrushes.

Also, if for some reason you do use any of these bizarre suggestions, we’d love to see pictures!

Also also, we’re happy to take any and all Reese’s Peanut Butter cups you don’t want off your hands.  Just putting that out there.

Pokemon Go at Bryant

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Catching a Zubat in game

If you’ve liked our page on Facebook, you may have noticed that we’re playing Pokemon Go (also, go like our page if you haven’t yet!). Pokemon Go is a free augmented reality mobile game for iPhone and Andriod where you can catch, evolve, and battle Pokemon. The game uses GPS to put Pokemon, gyms, and Pokestops, (special locations that give you items) in real-life locations, so that you can catch Pokemon while exploring your neighborhood.

There are a bunch of locations on campus that tie in with the game, including the library! The Bello Grand Hall is a Pokestop and you can also catch Pokemon inside the library (so far I’ve seen Zubat, Eevee, and Pidgey in here). The Chase Fitness Center, Fisher Center, Koffler Building, bookstore, and the Alumni Path are all Pokestops, so visit these locations to get items like Pokeballs, eggs, and potions.

Bryant also has two Pokemon gyms, one at the Bryant Arch and one at Hall 9, where trainers can battle for control of the gym once they reach level 5.

If you want some more information on how to play, check out this article from USA Today, or try this article from Forbes for some more advanced strategies. Let us know if you’ve got any good tips, especially if you know where to find some rare Pokemon!

Google Scholar Guide

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Hello Bryant professors (and Bryant students who are getting published)! Are you on Google Scholar yet? You should be! Google Scholar lets you create a profile for yourself that will highlight your published works and make them easier to find online. Here are a few benefits to creating a profile:

  • Your profile will shows how many times each of your works has been cited by others
  • Gives you more visibility online so more users can find your articles
  • Your profile will link to all your work, and you’ll be linked to as a co-author on others’ pages, which makes it easy for users to find other articles you’ve written

To get started creating your own profile, go to this link and click “Get started with Google Scholar Citations.” Fill in your information, such as name, institution, your Bryant email address, areas of interest, and your webpage, and click next.

Google Scholar form

Next, you can select the articles you’ve written from the list Google gives you. To add an article to your profile, click “Add article.”

Google Scholar choose articles

When you’re done selecting all your articles, click Next step on the bottom left, and choose whether to let Google Scholar to automatically update your profile to correct citations or delete redundant entries, or whether you’d rather be emailed and make the changes yourself.

Google will also send you an email to verify your email address–just click the “Verify email address” link in the email they send out to do this.

Another key step is to make your profile public by clicking the Edit link next to “My profile is private” and select “My profile is open.” A public profile will allow others to view your profile, since private profiles will not show up in Google Scholar. If you’d like, upload a picture of yourself and make any other edits to your profile.

Google Scholar Make public

Once your profile is all set up, you’ll notice some information on the right of your profile. Under citations, Google will list the total number of times your works have been cited, and in the other column, how many times they’ve been cited in the last five years. There are also some Google metrics displayed, such as h-index, which measures productivity and impact, and i10-index, which shows how many of your articles have been cited 10 or more times. For more info on these, you can read a quick description by mousing over them. Your profile also links to your co-author’s Google Scholar pages, and their pages will link back to you.

Here’s an example of a profile that’s fully set up that shows the metrics and co-author sections:

Google Scholar profile

To get some more of your articles on your Google Scholar page, ask to have your works added to Bryant University’s Digital Commons, Bryant’s institutional repository. Any articles uploaded into the Digital Commons will be accessible through Google Scholar and will be linked to under your profile.

To have your work added or for help setting up a profile, send an email to Becca Pac at rpac@bryant.edu.

Accio bulldog!

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Tupper PotterHave you checked out our visiting exhibit, Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine yet?  Tupper did today, and as you can see he clearly enjoyed it. It’s to be expected, though, because let’s face it, he’s clearly the library’s Patronus.

(He couldn’t believe Nicholas Flamel was a real guy, either… we’re all floored by that particular revelation.)

The exhibit runs through February 28th. Be sure to check it out before it apparates away.

Schoolhouse Rock: Library Study Room Edition!

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study room slideFinal exams are almost upon us and we’re getting tons of study room requests, and we’re happy to fill them of course, but if you’re not doing it correctly we have to cancel them and you run the risk of losing out on study space.  So just remember the simple rules shown above in groovy 1970s fashion.

And if you need more information on our study room request policies, be sure to visit this page!

Library closing at 6pm on Halloween

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Great-PumpkinJust a reminder that we will be closing at 6pm on Halloween so everyone has the chance to go out and acquire as much candy as possible, and then go find a pumpkin patch sincere enough to attract the attention of the Great Pumpkin. This is the year, I’m sure of it.

We’ll be open our normal schedule for the rest of the weekend: 10am – 6pm on Saturday, and Noon – 1:30am on Sunday.  Happy Halloween, everyone!

Celebrate Banned Books Week, September 21-27

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We read banned books! And sometimes pose with them!

We read banned books! And sometimes we pose with them for promotional purposes! But mostly read!

The week of September 21st through 27th marks Banned Books Week, the annual campaign by the American Library Association (ALA) dedicated to protecting intellectual freedom and the right to read whatever you choose. Every year, individuals and groups throughout the country occasionally demand that access to certain titles be restricted, or that they be removed completely, leading to an event ALA calls a challenge. Sometimes these efforts end up being successful, leading to an outright ban. Challenges and bans of books can occur in public, K-12, university, or special libraries; retail outlets where books are sold; classrooms; and anywhere else thoughts and ideas can be encountered and considered.

To give you an idea of the scope of this, over 11,300 books have been challenged since ALA started the event in 1982. In 2013 alone, there were 307 challenges reported to ALA’s Office of Intellectual Freedom. The total number of challenges may be higher still, but many go unreported. This year’s most frequently challenged books include a diverse group of titles ranging from Dav Pilkey’s Captain Underpants series to 50 Shades of Grey. Click here for the list of the top 10 most frequently challenged books for each year since 2001.

This year, the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund is also heavily involved with Banned Books Week, highlighting the fact that comic books and graphic novels of all topics and age ranges are frequently the victim of library and classroom challenges. You can follow this link to their website for more information, frequently asked questions, and a PDF handbook featuring a cover by Bone cartoonist and author Jeff Smith (who also finds himself on this year’s Top 10 challenges list).

We know this is a busy time of year for students, faculty, and staff alike, but take the time to celebrate your intellectual freedom. Read a banned book, have an unpopular idea, and embrace the freedom of thought and expression the Constitution allows.

Banned Books Week