Kanopy and Chill: Streaming using the Library

Standard

Hey there! It’s your friendly Bryant librarian, updating the blog on winter break. How’s it going? If the break is getting a little long we can help! We have some great library resources that can enlighten and entertain you, even away from campus. Did you know that the library has a whole database that encompasses “A collection of thousands of streaming documentaries, indie films and more?” We do! It’s called Kanopy.

According to their website, Kanopy streams more than 26,000 films to over 3,000 higher education campuses worldwide, reaching millions of students around the globe. With over 75 subjects, Kanopy partners with the Great Courses, Criterion Collection, PBS and more, to collect hard-to find films that cover a multitude of educational subjects.

Where else can you stream movies that teach and show you interesting subjects? You can see the Criterion Collection and Documentaries all in the same space. How else can you find great documentaries on Doing Business in Singapore and then Madame Tutli Putli?

This is a great resource for professors to try out at Bryant too. Thousands of video examples are here at your fingertips. You can watch a whole film or create an account and clip scenes from different films to create an informational playlist. Use them in the classroom to explain a topic, inform students or just to enjoy!

kanopy_1

You’re getting your mind ready for classes again, while relaxing. Best of both worlds.

Study tool: Zotero

Standard

Research season has begun! If you’re collecting all your class readings for the semester, starting your Capstone project, or just want to keep your research more organized, you should check out Zotero, a free tool (for the lowest amount of storage—you can pay for more space) described on their website as “a personal research assistant.”

Here are some of the things Zotero can do:

  • Save PDFs of articles you found in a database, or links to web resources with the browser widget
  • Access files you’ve saved by logging into the Zotero website
  • Create different folders for different classes, projects, or aspects of your topic
  • Share articles with other people by adding them to a group
  • Add your own notes to each article, such as how it relates to your thesis, what pages to focus on, or the assignment they’re for
  • Generate citations in APA, MLA, or Chicago format (make sure to double-check them for accuracy just in case!)

Zotero is available for Mac, Windows, and Linux. To get started, go to the Zotero website, make an account, and download the program.

Google Scholar Citations

Standard

Google Scholar Citations is a fast and easy way for you to track publication history, citations, and other useful information about articles. When searching Google Scholar you may have noticed that at the bottom of each article record is a link that says Cited By: #. Google Scholar prominently displays the numbers of times a particular article has been cited by other researchers and academics.  Google Scholar uses its own search function to find articles that are available through a variety of means such as through library databases and Digital Commons. The more accessible a researcher has made their article, the more chances are that someone will find it. Google makes it easy for researchers and scholars to set up their own author profile page.

 

ScholarRegis

When start to create a Google Scholar citation profile page you just need to enter in your name, school affiliation, institutional e-mail address, and area of interest. It will instantly track citations to publications tied to your name. You can also do this manually through Google’s system. Once you have your user profile created you can then explore metrics, graphs, and many other interesting and unique pieces of data.

 

Scholar

 

More and more students and researchers are using Google Scholar to do research and track metrics. Register for your account, and start tracking your citations today. If you need help creating an account or have questions please contact the Research and Instruction Desk in the library.

The Library’s Spring Newsletter is Here

Standard

Lots of big things happening at your very own Douglas and Judith Krupp Library, and you can read all about it in the spring edition of our newsletter.

newsletterNew department names!  A new librarian!  New databases!  New books!  New locations for supplies!  How can you possibly hope to keep track of all these changes without a scorecard?  Read up on all of this newness, as well as looks back at the recent Geek the Library campaign and some Bryant history, a profile on one of our student workers, and more.

Click here to read the newsletter online and stay in the know!

Reference Collection Additions

Standard

It’s finals time here at the library, and the library is full of studious people working on final projects and papers. To help you with your projects and scholarly pursuits we regularly purchase books and materials to add to our collection. Some interesting reference books arrived recently that may help you with a last minute paper. A reference librarian is the person to ask for help to peruse these materials. Take a look at some of our recent additions:

The Oxford Handbook of the Psychology of Appearance 

Boy Culture: An Encyclopedia

Climate Change: An Encyclopedia of Science and History

As always if you need help finding an article, book, or just need help finding something out: Ask a Librarian!

Good luck with finals!

We geek languages, and so can you with Mango

Standard

As you’re probably aware, we have 7 laptops available for check-out that are dedicated to the use of the Rosetta Stone language software – one language per laptop, available in Spanish, French, Chinese (Mandarin), Italian, Russian. Japanese, and Gaelic.  But if you haven’t had any luck getting ahold of one these laptops – or maybe would like to learn a language beyond the 7 we currently offer – we have another solution for you that you won’t have to wait around for and is available to you via your web browser even as you read this: Mango Languages.

mango logoMango is a web-based language-learning tool that is available to you cheap-as-free thanks to the fine folks at AskRI.org and accessible through the Articles & Databases page on the Krupp Library website (just scroll down to the M’s).  Create an account and in just a minute or two you’ll be ready to go.  Once you’re logged in, explore your account dashboard a little – you’ll see places to keep track of the languages you’re studying and the lessons completed, as well as tabs for support and a translation tool – and then click the Languages tab to see what’s available to you.

Mango screenshot - languagesAs you can see, there are over 60 languages available.  Sure, you can learn Spanish, French, or Chinese (Mandarin and Cantonese), but you can also go for Greek (modern and ancient), Icelandic, Swedish, Hebrew (traditional or Biblical), Swahili, Tagalog, or even Pirate (what, no Klingon or Old High Gallifreyan?).

Basically, you have options, and you don’t have to wait around for someone to return that Rosetta laptop or worry about your place on the waiting list.  Give it a shot… you sure as heck can’t beat the price.

What do you geek, Bryant?

Standard

geek defAs you can see above, “geek” is a verb.  If you geek something – comic books, football, painting, gardening, home brewing, physics, running, cooking, Russian literature, or pretty much any other thing you can name – then you love it, talk about it at length to anyone who will listen, and know more about it than some people would consider reasonable.  Fact: everyone geeks something.  And chances are, the library can help you with that in some way.

This semester, the Douglas & Judith Krupp Library is taking part in Geek the Library, a national campaign co-sponsored by OCLC and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation that is designed to help raise awareness and generate support (vocal, financial, and maybe even at the ballot box) for libraries throughout the country.  Using “geek” as a verb is a way to get people to think about the things they’re passionate about, and then connect that back to libraries, because no matter what it is that you geek, your library (be it your local public library or your school’s library) can connect you with resources, material, and even people to help support those passions, and possibly help you discover new ones.

You’ll be seeing a lot of information about this from us in the weeks ahead, whether it’s here on the blog, on social media (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, etc.), around campus, and at the library itself.  And there will be plenty of ways for you to participate in this as well, so keep your eyes and ears open.

Start getting your geek on, Bryant.  And ask yourselves this question: What Do You Geek?

whatdoyougeek