IMPORTANT NEWS: Bryant’s Exit from the HELIN Catalog

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In case you missed the email messages that have gone out to the Bryant community this summer, the Douglas and Judith Krupp Library is leaving the HELIN catalog and will be moving its catalog and backend systems to OCLC’s WorldShare Management System (WMS).  You may have already used the catalog this summer, as the links from our website were switched over to WMS several weeks ago, but we expect everything to be fully migrated by September 1st, if not sooner.

Due to the advanced timeline, lending and borrowing activities between Bryant and other HELIN libraries will pause during the last stage of the migration period.  We have worked with the HELIN office to come up with final lending and borrowing dates:

LAST DAY TO REQUEST – AUGUST 12 (last date for HELIN libraries to request Bryant books, and last date for Bryant to request books from HELIN libraries).

LAST CHECKOUT DATE  – AUGUST 19 (this gives a full week for the books to be in transit to Bryant or from Bryant which allows time on the hold shelf for patron pickup)

DUE DATE – SEPTEMBER 7 (this allows for a 19 day borrowing period and for 2 weeks for overdue notices and to collect on overdue books).  If your library users cannot return Bryant items by this date, please let us know and we can switch the HELIN checkout to an interlibrary loan.

Once we are fully migrated, Bryant holdings may be searched via the WorldCat link in the HELIN catalog or by searching directly in Bryant’s new catalog at http://bryant.on.worldcat.org/discovery  The catalog is still evolving, but will allow you to search for items here at Bryant, throughout the state of Rhode Island, and in libraries worldwide.

Bryant will remain a member of HELIN until December 31, 2015, but even beyond that date we will still be an active member of the library community both here in Rhode Island and beyond our borders, and will work with patrons and other libraries alike to foster cooperating and connect people with the information resources they need.

This will be a time of enormous change for everyone, ourselves included, and we are happy to speak with anyone about any questions, concerns, or even fears they may have.  Our top priority is always providing our patrons with the best service possible and this is not a move we make lightly or without consideration.  We think this will be of great benefit to all of our community, and ask for your patience, understanding, and feedback during our transition period and beyond.  All of our contact information can be found at this link.

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Schoolhouse Rock: Library Study Room Edition!

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study room slideFinal exams are almost upon us and we’re getting tons of study room requests, and we’re happy to fill them of course, but if you’re not doing it correctly we have to cancel them and you run the risk of losing out on study space.  So just remember the simple rules shown above in groovy 1970s fashion.

And if you need more information on our study room request policies, be sure to visit this page!

The Library’s Spring Newsletter is Here

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Lots of big things happening at your very own Douglas and Judith Krupp Library, and you can read all about it in the spring edition of our newsletter.

newsletterNew department names!  A new librarian!  New databases!  New books!  New locations for supplies!  How can you possibly hope to keep track of all these changes without a scorecard?  Read up on all of this newness, as well as looks back at the recent Geek the Library campaign and some Bryant history, a profile on one of our student workers, and more.

Click here to read the newsletter online and stay in the know!

We geek languages, and so can you with Mango

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As you’re probably aware, we have 7 laptops available for check-out that are dedicated to the use of the Rosetta Stone language software – one language per laptop, available in Spanish, French, Chinese (Mandarin), Italian, Russian. Japanese, and Gaelic.  But if you haven’t had any luck getting ahold of one these laptops – or maybe would like to learn a language beyond the 7 we currently offer – we have another solution for you that you won’t have to wait around for and is available to you via your web browser even as you read this: Mango Languages.

mango logoMango is a web-based language-learning tool that is available to you cheap-as-free thanks to the fine folks at AskRI.org and accessible through the Articles & Databases page on the Krupp Library website (just scroll down to the M’s).  Create an account and in just a minute or two you’ll be ready to go.  Once you’re logged in, explore your account dashboard a little – you’ll see places to keep track of the languages you’re studying and the lessons completed, as well as tabs for support and a translation tool – and then click the Languages tab to see what’s available to you.

Mango screenshot - languagesAs you can see, there are over 60 languages available.  Sure, you can learn Spanish, French, or Chinese (Mandarin and Cantonese), but you can also go for Greek (modern and ancient), Icelandic, Swedish, Hebrew (traditional or Biblical), Swahili, Tagalog, or even Pirate (what, no Klingon or Old High Gallifreyan?).

Basically, you have options, and you don’t have to wait around for someone to return that Rosetta laptop or worry about your place on the waiting list.  Give it a shot… you sure as heck can’t beat the price.

The iPad Mini is here!

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ipadminiThe library now has 3 iPad Minis to loan out!

Same deal as the iPad 2… you can check it out for 7 days, with an option to renew for an additional 7 days, and these are available to Bryant students, staff, and faculty only.  If you come by and we don’t have any available, you can ask to be put on our waiting list.

It’s the iPad, but smaller.

But, you know, bigger than your phone.

Either way, enjoy it, and let us know what you think!

Thanks to you, the BookScan Station has returned.

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So a few months ago we were all
can haz scanner

But now we’re all
bookscan station is back

Because at long last our beloved BookScan Station
scanner

has returned! It’s back in its old location between the copy machines on the first floor, just waiting for you to come and scan your books and documents in an easy, frustration free manner. In the interest of full disclosure we should point out that the scan-to-email function is not working yet, but this is a known issue and will hopefully be resolved soon.

Thank you, Bryant community, for showing your support and letting your voices be heard in saying that you wanted this to come back to the library, since that showed the Powers That Be that this was a useful and needed device for our patrons.  We literally could not have gotten it back without your efforts.  And we promise to stop all this meme abuse now.

Well, okay, one more.
fry

Good IDEAs on the future of libraries

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Bryant’s IDEA (that’s “Innovation and Design Experience for All” for those of you playing along at home) was held Monday, January 21st through Wednesday, January 23rd, and gave this year’s freshman class the opportunity to apply design thinking and teamwork skills to a variety of “real world” applications covering a wide array of topics – transportation, the environment, retail, food service, cultural programs, community involvement, and many more.  Group #4, mentored by Thom Bassett, Stephanie Carter, and Kyle Nyskohus, tackled the topic of libraries, and the students in that group generated several projects conveying their ideas on the future of libraries – what services they should provide, what materials should be offered, how they should be constructed, etc.  Some of these projects are now on display on the first floor of the library:

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Take the time to give them a closer look as you walk by.  There are lots of good ideas being thrown around here – some that libraries across the world are already in the process of implementing, some that are aspired toward, and probably a few that no one has even considered yet.  We’re such big fans that we’re hoping to get some of these students to present their ideas to us in person somewhere down the line.

Group 4 (and everyone else involved with IDEA) did a bang-up job on this.  Give their work a look, they’ve really earned your attention!